English  Nederlands  Change Skin / Website look   Bookmark and Share

Navigation
Affiliates
Sponsors

 
Google  



  Spartan Stories - Rudyard Kipling - The Second Jungle Book 

Category: Rudyard Kipling, Stories, Public Domain, Adventure stories, Savage, India, Jungle, Creatures, Mowgli, The Jungle Book, Short Stories Collection, Novel, Mid Length Novel

Short description The Second Jungle Book is a collection of short story adventure masterpieces. It features five stories about Mowgli and three unrelated stories "The Miracle of Purun Bhagat", "The Undertakers" and "Quiquern", all but one set in India, most of which Kipling wrote while living in Vermont. This book is less well-known than the original.
Writers Rudyard Kipling
Names The Second Jungle Book, The Jungle Book 2, The 2nd Jungle Book
Last Update 2010
Age 6+
Series Mowgli, The Jungle Book
Type Adventure stories, Savage, India, Jungle, Creatures
Domain Public Domain
Score unrated
Length Short Stories Collection, Novel, Mid Length Novel
Chapters 1. How Fear Came, 2. The Law of the Jungle, 3. The Miracle of Purun Bhagat, 4. A Song of Kabir, 5. Letting In the Jungle, 6. Mowgli's Song Against People, 7. The Undertakers, 8. A Ripple Song, 9. The King's Ankus, 10. The Song of the Little Hunter, 11. Quiquern, 12. "Angutivaun Taina", 13. Red Dog, 14. Chil's Song, 15. The Spring Running, 16. Chil's Song

The Second Jungle Book

Each even-numbered chapter is a poem related to the preceding chapter's story.

2. The Law of the Jungle

Just to give you an idea of the immense variety of the Jungle Law, I have translated into verse (Baloo always recited them in a sort of sing-song) a few of the laws that apply to the wolves. There are, of course, hundreds and hundreds more, but these will do for specimens of the simpler rulings.


Now this is the Law of the Jungle--as old and as true as the sky;
And the Wolf that shall keep it may prosper, but the Wolf that shall break it must die.

As the creeper that girdles the tree-trunk the Law runneth forward and back--
For the strength of the Pack is the Wolf, and the strength of the Wolf is the Pack.

Wash daily from nose-tip to tail-tip; drink deeply, but never too deep;
And remember the night is for hunting, and forget not the day is for sleep.

The jackal may follow the Tiger, but, Cub, when thy whiskers are grown,
Remember the Wolf is a hunter--go forth and get food of thine own.

Keep peace with the Lords of the Jungle--the Tiger, the Panther, the Bear;
And trouble not Hathi the Silent, and mock not the Boar in his lair.

When Pack meets with Pack in the Jungle, and neither will go from the trail,
Lie down till the leaders have spoken--it may be fair words shall prevail.

When ye fight with a Wolf of the Pack, ye must fight him alone and afar,
Lest others take part in the quarrel, and the Pack be diminished by war.

The Lair of the Wolf is his refuge, and where he has made him his home,
Not even the Head Wolf may enter, not even the Council may come.

The Lair of the Wolf is his refuge, but where he has digged it too plain,
The Council shall send him a message, and so he shall change it again.

If ye kill before midnight, be silent, and wake not the woods with your bay,
Lest ye frighten the deer from the crops, and the brothers go empty away.

Ye may kill for yourselves, and your mates, and your cubs as they need, and ye can;
But kill not for pleasure of killing, and seven times never kill Man.

If ye plunder his Kill from a weaker, devour not all in thy pride;
Pack-Right is the right of the meanest; so leave him the head and the hide.

The Kill of the Pack is the meat of the Pack. Ye must eat where it lies;
And no one may carry away of that meat to his lair, or he dies.

The Kill of the Wolf is the meat of the Wolf. He may do what he will,
But, till he has given permission, the Pack may not eat of that Kill.

Cub-Right is the right of the Yearling. From all of his Pack he may claim
Full-gorge when the killer has eaten; and none may refuse him the same.

Lair-Right is the right of the Mother. From all of her year she may claim
One haunch of each kill for her litter, and none may deny her the same.

Cave-Right is the right of the Father--to hunt by himself for his own.
He is freed of all calls to the Pack; he is judged by the Council alone.

Because of his age and his cunning, because of his gripe and his paw,
In all that the Law leaveth open, the word of the Head Wolf is Law.

Now these are the Laws of the Jungle, and many and mighty are they;
But the head and the hoof of the Law and the haunch and the hump is--Obey!

Previous Chapter: 1. How Fear Came / Next Chapter: 3. The Miracle of Purun Bhagat

Chapters: 1. How Fear Came, 2. The Law of the Jungle, 3. The Miracle of Purun Bhagat, 4. A Song of Kabir, 5. Letting In the Jungle, 6. Mowgli's Song Against People, 7. The Undertakers, 8. A Ripple Song, 9. The King's Ankus, 10. The Song of the Little Hunter, 11. Quiquern, 12. "Angutivaun Taina", 13. Red Dog, 14. Chil's Song, 15. The Spring Running, 16. Chil's Song

See also

If you like this story you might also want to check these out by cliking here to read them for free.



Homer - Iliad Homer - Odyssey Jack London - The Call of the Wild
Jack London - White Fang Robert E. Howard - Lord of Samarcand Robert E. Howard - The Beast from the Abyss
Robert E. Howard - The Bull Dog Breed Robert E. Howard - The Hyena Robert E. Howard - The Valley of the Worm
Rudyard Kipling - In the Rukh Rudyard Kipling - The Jungle Book Rudyard Kipling - The Second Jungle Book
Virgil - Aeneid

  Rate this page

4 Stars. Average rating: 4 from 8 votes.

  If you have any comments you can submit them here

No comments posted here.



Top of Page Bookmark and Share Top of Page
Home
This site and all its content is © of and hosted by: By Spartan Law!