English  Nederlands  Change Skin / Website look   Bookmark and Share

Navigation
Affiliates
Sponsors

 
Google  



  Spartan Stories - Rudyard Kipling - The Jungle Book 

Category: Rudyard Kipling, Stories, Public Domain, Adventure stories, Savage, India, Jungle, Creatures, Mowgli, The Jungle Book, Short Stories Collection, Novel, Mid Length Novel

Short description The Jungle Book is a collection of short story adventure masterpieces. The best-known of these stories are the first three revolving around the adventures of an abandoned 'man cub' Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. The most famous of the other stories are probably "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", the story of a heroic mongoose, "Toomai of the Elephants", the tale of a young elephant-handler and Kotick, The White Seal seeking for his people a haven where they would be safe from hunters.
Writers Rudyard Kipling
Names The Jungle Book, The First Jungle Book, The Jungle Book 1, The 1st Jungle Book
Last Update 2009
Age 6+
Series Mowgli, The Jungle Book
Type Adventure stories, Savage, India, Jungle, Creatures
Domain Public Domain
Score unrated
Length Short Stories Collection, Novel, Mid Length Novel
Chapters 1. Mowgli's Brothers, 2. Hunting-Song of the Seeonee Pack, 3. Kaa's Hunting, 4. Road-Song of the Bandar-Log, 5. "Tiger! Tiger!", 6. Mowgli's Song, 7. The Sounding of the Call, 8. Lukannon, 9. "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", 10. Darzee's Chant, 11. Toomai of the Elephants, 12. Shiv and the Grasshopper, 13. Her Majesty's Servants, 14. Parade Song of the Camp Animals

The Jungle Book

Each even-numbered chapter is a poem related to the preceding chapter's story.

6. Mowgli's Song

MOWGLI'S SONG
THAT HE SANG AT THE COUNCIL ROCK WHEN HE
DANCED ON SHERE KHAN'S HIDE

The Song of Mowgli-I, Mowgli, am singing. Let the jungle
listen to the things I have done.

Shere Khan said he would kill-would kill! At the gates in the
twilight he would kill Mowgli, the Frog!

He ate and he drank. Drink deep, Shere Khan, for when wilt thou
drink again? Sleep and dream of the kill.

I am alone on the grazing-grounds. Gray Brother, come to me!
Come to me, Lone Wolf, for there is big game afoot!

Bring up the great bull buffaloes, the blue-skinned herd bulls
with the angry eyes. Drive them to and fro as I order.

Sleepest thou still, Shere Khan? Wake, oh, wake! Here come I,
and the bulls are behind.

Rama, the King of the Buffaloes, stamped with his foot. Waters of
the Waingunga, whither went Shere Khan?

He is not Ikki to dig holes, nor Mao, the Peacock, that he should fly. He is not Mang the Bat, to hang in the branches. Little bamboos that creak together, tell me where he ran?

Ow! He is there. Ahoo! He is there. Under the feet of Rama
lies the Lame One! Up, Shere Khan!

Up and kill! Here is meat; break the necks of the bulls!

Hsh! He is asleep. We will not wake him, for his strength is very great. The kites have come down to see it. The black ants have come up to know it. There is a great assembly in his honor.

Alala! I have no cloth to wrap me. The kites will see that I am
naked. I am ashamed to meet all these people.

Lend me thy coat, Shere Khan. Lend me thy gay striped coat that I
may go to the Council Rock.

By the Bull that bought me I made a promise-a little promise.
Only thy coat is lacking before I keep my word.

With the knife, with the knife that men use, with the knife of the
hunter, I will stoop down for my gift.

Waters of the Waingunga, Shere Khan gives me his coat for the love that he bears me. Pull, Gray Brother! Pull, Akela! Heavy is the hide of Shere Khan.

The Man Pack are angry. They throw stones and talk child's talk.
My mouth is bleeding. Let me run away.

Through the night, through the hot night, run swiftly with me, my brothers. We will leave the lights of the village and go to the low moon.

Waters of the Waingunga, the Man-Pack have cast me out. I did
them no harm, but they were afraid of me. Why?

Wolf Pack, ye have cast me out too. The jungle is shut to me and
the village gates are shut. Why?

As Mang flies between the beasts and birds, so fly I between the
village and the jungle. Why?

I dance on the hide of Shere Khan, but my heart is very heavy. My mouth is cut and wounded with the stones from the village, but my heart is very light, because I have come back to the jungle. Why?
These two things fight together in me as the snakes fight in the spring. The water comes out of my eyes; yet I laugh while it falls. Why?

I am two Mowglis, but the hide of Shere Khan is under my feet.

All the jungle knows that I have killed Shere Khan. Look-look
well, O Wolves!

Ahae! My heart is heavy with the things that I do not understand.

Previous Chapter: 5. "Tiger! Tiger!" / Next Chapter: 7. The Sounding of the Call

Chapters: 1. Mowgli's Brothers, 2. Hunting-Song of the Seeonee Pack, 3. Kaa's Hunting, 4. Road-Song of the Bandar-Log, 5. "Tiger! Tiger!", 6. Mowgli's Song, 7. The Sounding of the Call, 8. Lukannon, 9. "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", 10. Darzee's Chant, 11. Toomai of the Elephants, 12. Shiv and the Grasshopper, 13. Her Majesty's Servants, 14. Parade Song of the Camp Animals

See also

If you like this story you might also want to check these out by cliking here to read them for free.



Homer - Iliad Homer - Odyssey Jack London - The Call of the Wild
Jack London - White Fang Robert E. Howard - Lord of Samarcand Robert E. Howard - The Beast from the Abyss
Robert E. Howard - The Bull Dog Breed Robert E. Howard - The Hyena Robert E. Howard - The Valley of the Worm
Rudyard Kipling - In the Rukh Rudyard Kipling - The Jungle Book Rudyard Kipling - The Second Jungle Book
Virgil - Aeneid

  Rate this page

3.5 Stars. Average rating: 3.5 from 4 votes.

  If you have any comments you can submit them here

No comments posted here.



Top of Page Bookmark and Share Top of Page
Home
This site and all its content is © of and hosted by: By Spartan Law!